Tim Swan

Work —

Signing Up

2015

A signup page is vital to any self-servicing product website. It’s the page that can turn a prospect into a customer – needless to say, it’s important to get right. Campaign Monitor's signup page has always performed well, but we were always considering ways to improve on it.

In the past, changes had been made to the page without touching the form itself – adding a different customer quote or logos for credibility. I looked at this page in the context of our entire website and considered the actions you'd taken to get here. The only thing this page needed was a form. No distractions. I removed the sidebar to focus on the form itself… nobody missed it.

Refining the experience

7-8 fields to sign up for Campaign Monitor seemed excessive and I wanted to reduce this number. I was able to remove the timezone and country field by using cookies to automatically determine this information with a fallback to reveal the fields if this information couldn't be received. With the help of our engineers, I was also able to use the company name and generate the account URL for those customers that didn't require it, without breaking the correct onboarding.

Form improvements

Shortening the form made the barrier for signing up much smaller, and I wanted to see if I could improve the overall UX of the form, specifically around how our forms currently used labels and placeholder text. The majority of the forms on our site used placeholder text as a label and I wanted to challenge that pattern.

I had an idea of transforming placeholder text into a label on :focus, which remained present when the field was filled in and disappeared back to placeholder if no text was present.

Testing the form

To make sure the implementation of the new design didn't hurt the current conversions and did, in fact, prove our theories correct I worked with our Director of Digital Marketing to run A/B tests – the current page vs. the new page followed by the winning page vs. the UX improvements. The new designs for the ‘Sign Up’ page resulted in almost a 10% improvement for the page, and although the form interactions were inconclusive, the ultimate objectives were met.